Brazier

Brazier

Dublin Core

Title

Brazier

Subject

[no text]

Description

In the text, the brazier is pierced and made of copper. Dorian uses the brazier to perform a sort of mind clearing cleanse after burning Basil's clothing and bag, lighting "Algerian pastilles" in the brazier (Wilde 174). This sort of object is tied to Turkish culture, which extends the "far East" metaphor Dorian's library begins to convey in its secret Florentine cabinet and opium box.
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The image of depicts the base of an iron purification brazier, perhaps like the one Dorian uses in the text. It is inlaid with gold and silver, dates from the 15th-17th century, and originates from Tibet (not Turkey). According to the Met website, it was used for sacrificial burnings and purification rights. Though Dorian's brazier could be more like a hookah, in the text, it seems to serve a similar function as a purification vessel might—the object acts as a means for Dorian to cleanse himself after disposing of Basil's body.

Creator

Oscar Wilde
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The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Source


Wilde, Oscar. The Picture of Dorian Gray. Penguin, 2000.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Publisher

Penguin
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The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Date

Wilde's text/1891
Penguin text/ 2000
Brazier/ 15th-17th Century

Contributor

Hannah Phillips

Rights

Penguin Books/ The Met

Relation

[no text]

Format

[no text]

Language

English

Type

Text, still image

Identifier

[no text]

Coverage

[no text]

Citation

Oscar Wilde --- The Metropolitan Museum of Art, “Brazier,” Objects and Interiority in Dorian Gray, accessed October 15, 2018, https://doriangrayarchiveeng578.omeka.net/items/show/10.

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