Italian cassone

Cassone

Dublin Core

Title

Italian cassone

Subject

[no text]

Description

In the school room space, Dorian recognizes this piece of furniture as something he would hide himself inside as a child (a literal type of closeting in the text). It is described as having "fantastically painted panels" with "tarnished gilt mouldings" (Wilde 118) suggesting that it is fairly old and disused. Like much of Dorian's attic room furniture the piece seems to be more Renaissance or Gothic in style.
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The Met attributes this cassone to the workshop of mid 15th century Florentine artist Apollonio di Giovanni di Tomaso. It is described as being made of poplar wood, linen, polychromed and gilded gesso, and panels painted in tempera and gold. Though this may not be the exact piece referenced in Wilde's text, the painting and gilding of the piece are similar to what Dorian keeps in his schoolroom.

Creator

Oscar Wilde
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The Met, Apollonio di Giovanni di Tomaso

Source

Wilde, Oscar. The Picture of Dorian Gray. Penguin, 2000.
The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Publisher

Penguin
The Met

Date

Wilde's text/ 1891
Penguin/ 2000
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After 1461

Contributor

Hannah Phillips

Rights

Penguin Books
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The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Relation

[no text]

Format

[no text]

Language

English

Type

Text, still image

Identifier

[no text]

Coverage

[no text]

Citation

Oscar Wilde --- The Met, Apollonio di Giovanni di Tomaso, “Italian cassone,” Objects and Interiority in Dorian Gray, accessed November 14, 2018, https://doriangrayarchiveeng578.omeka.net/items/show/13.

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